The Ambulance

Old Ambulance picture

The WWII Ambulance.

I mentioned in my last blog the Boy Scouts and the Girl Guides anonymously acquired an unlicensed WW II ambulance. It was used in all sorts of ways as development of Echo Park began with the transportation of used bricks from a derelict building at the Piper Moss Mine which had also seen better days.

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It Takes a Villiage

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It Takes a Village.

I’ve written a lot about my parents and the contribution they made to developing Que Que from a paltry village to the industrial hub of Rhodesia. However, of course long before Hilary Clinton coined the phrase It Takes a Village Que Que knew the meaning of this all too well. For instance, this is how Echo Park came into being.

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Rhodesia from beginning to end

Rhodesia beginning to end by Ron Morkel

Ron Morkel’s family saga, Rhodesia beginning to end, culminates at the family farm, Mazuri Ranch, in the Rhodesdale district forty miles south east of Que Que.

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Gabby Turnbull Our Celebrated English Teacher

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Gabby Turnbull Our Celebrated English Teacher

Gabby Turnbull, our much loved English teacher, was small in stature but had a ramrod straight back, said to be the result of a WWII injury that he never mentioned. Even the boys took an interest in English Literature as he guided classes through Twelfth Night (what a struggle!) and challenged us with the Canterbury Tales and the convolutions of The Mayor of Casterbridge. Some old boys remember him joining them for a quick smoke near the school bus. He was editor and producer of the Que Que High School Magazine for many years. Here is his editorial from the 1959 edition:

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Predictions from a Que Que High School Student

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Predictions from a Que Que High School Student

Que Que High School was the only high school for the whole district. All kinds of kids went there. Here’s a submission to the High School Magazine from Morris Sloman in Form 1A in 1959. Many of his fanciful suggestions for improvement are common practice today.

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A Learning Curve

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A Learning Curve

After a while at the Public health Laboratories on North Avenue in Salisbury I got a chance to get a transfer to Harare Hospital in the industrial part of town servicing the African township. It boasted the second largest outpatient intake in Southern Africa, after Baragwanath Hospital in Soweto township in Johannesburg serving a thousand outpatients a day. I was sure to learn something there.

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