The Back Of The Bus

The-Back-Of-The-Bus

The Back Of The Bus

Lots of change was in the air in the early sixties. The ‘Negro’ Freedom Riders were protesting being relegated to sit at the back of the bus in the American South. Their bus was set alight. Macmillan’s Winds of Change were sweeping down Africa. The great experiment of the Federation of Rhodesia and Nyasaland was dismantled in December of 1963. Northern Rhodesia and Nyasaland got their independence. My brother, Brian, finished up school at Chaplin High and was headed for Cape Town University and his own much anticipated independence.

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A Diagnosis In A Jiffy

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A Diagnosis In A Jiffy

Dad liked company. Once I learned to behave and before I got into serious swimming I kept Dad company on the weekly trips to outlying afternoon clinics he had acquired at the Umniati Power Station, Redcliff, and the Gaika and Connemara Mines.

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The Difference Between Half A Crown and Five Shillings

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The Difference Between Half a Crown and Five Shillings

The much respected Menashe family owned a habadashery store. They were pioneer stock in Que Que from the island of Rhodes. Their beautiful twin daughters had just graduated from medical school in the Union of South Africa. They were home for a few months pending taking up housemanships in Bulawayo at Mpilo Hospital.

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Cookie

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Cookie

Cookie was from Northern Rhodesia, one of ten children, though six had died in early life. He had worked in the mines on the Copper Belt, saved enough to buy cattle for lobola and married. He had a gift for languages and had had two years of education. His easy going manner and roving spirit eventually brought him to the Globe and Phoenix Mine.

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The Sting

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The Sting

My older brother Brian embarked on a camping trip of his own with his friends Alec Friend, John Seton-Rogers, Mark Gilby, Phil Harris and Jan Polisensky. They wanted to see Kariba for themselves. Mom and Dad had given Brian an old WWII army tent and the heaviest fiberglass canoe ever constructed in the history of man for his thirteenth birthday. He had put it to good use camping locally around Dutchman’s Pool and on the Bembezaan River.

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What Happened to Mr. Teperson?

What-Happened-to-Mr.-Teperson

What Happened to Mr. Teperson?

You couldn’t miss the aroma wafting out of Mr. Teperson’s Midlands Bakery on Que Que’s Main Street as loaves of bread cooled on racks. Chocolate éclairs, sugar buns, Neapolitans and much, much more were displayed behind glass cases. Mr. Teperson catered for everybody. He personally tasted every batch of everything he made. Mrs. Teperson on the other hand was slim and minded the till. She knew what every customer wanted and had it bagged and rung up by the time the customer reached the counter.

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