The Big Catch At Kariba

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The Big Catch at Kariba.

The rescue of wild animals from the rising waters of Lake Kariba was called Operation Noah. Clouds of birds came to feed on insects and rodents as they were flushed from their nests. Sheets of ants floated on the surface of the lake. In the water below tigerfish rampaged with the glut of insects.

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Noah’s Stockings

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Noah’s Stockings

1916 was the last time lions were seen in Que Que. Sir Roy Welensky, the prime minister, famously said, “You can’t run a farm and a zoo.” Tsetse flies cause nagana, animal tripanosomiasis (sleeping sickness). The Southern Rhodesia game department, to control tsetse fly, shot over 300,000 wild animals in a big belt of country south of the Zambezi Valley. In the Valley itself, wild animals still abounded.

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An Epic Engineering Feat

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An Epic Engineering Feat

The Federation of Rhodesia and Nyasaland, formed in 1953, was a grand compromise, since amalgamation of the two Rhodesias was not politically possible. A decision was made to build the largest dam in the world on the Zambezi River, which Northern and Southern Rhodesia shared.

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The Termite Mine

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The Termite Mine
Bill West, despite having no formal training, was a wealthy man. He and his brother Sid owned the Jena Group of gold mines, the Lion, the Leopard and Leopardess in the Silobela District, way beyond Que Que, in the gramadoelas.

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I was Victrix Ludorum

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I was Victrix Ludorum

In my baby book my mother wrote ‘I was quick and bright for my age. At two I never stopped talking and was very affectionate, giving hugs and kisses indiscriminately, especially to men’.

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A Contribution Not Etched In Stone

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A Contribution Not Etched In Stone.

Water was a precious commodity in Rhodesia but Que Que district had several rivers. The challenge was to bring the water to the town so that it did not go thirsty in its long dry spell over the winter and well on into the heat of October before the rains came.

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