Rise ‘n Shine

5331438246_18f79ef28b.jpg

Rise ‘n Shine

Mom had often mused that she would love to have a farm and now she had one. In a country where ranches were sometimes 30,000 acres, she was ranching on 288.

Continue Reading →

We had a Farm in Africa

5331330196_d227c23638.jpg

We Had a Farm in Africa

The farm was acquired as a foreclosure when the second Hunt brother (of Hunter’s Road) succumbed to a coronary and the widows needed to sell. There were no buyers. The bank urged Dad to take over the residual mortgage indebtedness.

Continue Reading →

New Year’s Eve in Africa

5268196074_d893053018.jpg

New Year’s Eve in Africa

In the 1940’s Old Year’s Night was bigger than Christmas. It began with a dance organized by St. Luke’s Anglican Church. There was a lavish buffet supper spread at the Globe and Phoenix Hall. Everyone went to the dance. Old and young mingled so that a young girl could find herself floating on the portly stomach of an unlikely dance partner.

Continue Reading →

Christmas Day in Africa

Christmas Day in Africa

Christmas begins, officially, in America, on Thanksgiving with the arrival of Santa Claus, on a red sleigh, pulled by a team of reindeer at Macy’s Department Store at the end of the New York Macy’s Day Parade. Frantic shopping begins at midnight getting an early start to Black Friday which continues on to Cyber Monday. The count down is on.

But Christmas really is splendid here in Oregon, where the nights are long with bright star light, yet the days are often dark and stormy. The lights of the Christmas tree twinkle all the brighter and the smells of cedar and the spoils of the busy kitchen meld with the fire burning.

Continue Reading →

A King Tradition

A-King-Tradition

A King Tradition

When I was growing up in the 50’s we always had a house servant and a gardener to help keep the household running smoothly. Our ‘cookboy’ was John. Mom hoped to keep him for a long time so she invested a lot in him.

John was illiterate, but eager to learn. Mom was eager to teach him the ways of the kitchen to free herself up for other things. John still ate a traditional meal of mealie meal (thick grits) and gravy in his kai in the evening over the open fire in a black three legged pot. Mom’s kitchen was a challenge.

Continue Reading →

Chanukah in Africa

5249082981_b459dc67f1.jpg

Chanukah in Africa

Jews had made their way to Rhodesia in its earliest days, before the turn of the century. Josepth Schattil had come north before the Mafeking to Bulawayo railway was constructed. He could not afford the mule wagon coach service so he walked the 500 miles. Abraham Paul was the baker at the Globe and Phoenix Mine in 1911.

When Rhodes first arrived at Fort Salisbury he was appalled at the lack of development by his BSAC (British South Africa Company), but noted that the Jews were coming. It was a good sign.

Continue Reading →